Tips on Using Water To Attract More Birds to Your Backyard!
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Tips on Using Water To Attract More Birds to Your Backyard!

Tips on Using Water To Attract More Birds to Your Backyard!

There is no better way to get birds flocking to your yard than a good source of fresh water. A bird's need for water through every season of the year is so strong that even species you never expected will be attracted to a strategically placed water source.

Having a birdbath is an advantage to anyone who enjoys observing nature in general and bird behavior in particular.

The most natural spot for a bath is close to the ground, but water at higher levels not only appeals to some species, it reduces the bird's exposure to cat attacks. Soaking wet birds are no match for feline agility. Putting a birdbath near trees improves security against raptors. Plus, branches are an easily reached perch from which to preen in safety.

Locate your bath in a shady part of your yard. This will keep the water at a cooler, more refreshing temperature in hot weather.

To get birds accustomed to the bath, try placing a feeder within five feet of the bath. Birds will notice the water as they go to the feeder.

Birdbath water should be changed every few days to insure a fresh, clear supply. Place our birdbath fillers in a bath to ensure birds have a safe footing. Do these things, and birds will flock to your "community pool".

Add Motion To Water To Attract More Birds

Motion on the water's surface or the noise of falling water is like a magnet to the birds. Add one of our bamboo or brass pump kits, and move water in any bath, barrel or pond.

Drippers, misters, or small pump-driven fountains that keep the water moving have the added benefit of preventing mosquito eggs from hatching.

Hummingbirds love to zip through the "mist" created by a mister. Besides hummers zipping through the mist, you can attract warblers (who don't normally visit feeders) and many other birds to stop by for a refreshing "Leaf Bath". Watch how they use the wet leaves as a "wash cloth".

The Water Wiggler is a great way to get water moving in any bath. It runs on batteries for 60-90 days. No water or electric lines needed.

You can now also use solar powered misters to move water! Add sun and enjoy!

Water in Winter

How do birds drink? Most birds, like Cardinals, dip their bills and then tip their heads back to let the water run down their throats. Doves and Pigeons drink by immersing their bills and sucking up the water (much like a horse). Not all birds need to drink water. Hummingbirds, for example, have a largely liquid diet. But, they do enjoy "playing" in the water. Birds that live in areas with arid conditions can go for long periods of time without drinking.

A Winter Spa for the Birds

A Guaranteed Way to Increase Your Backyard Activity

What's a sure way to attract birds to your feeders? Of course water...especially in winter! About 70% of a bird's no-fat body tissue is water that needs to be maintained to avoid dehydration. Birds find some water in natural food sources: insects, berries, and even from snow, but when those supplies dwindle, the water YOU supply is even more vital!

Open water in freezing weather will attract as many or more birds, as a well-stocked feeder! Birds use it to help keep themselves warmer in winter! By cleaning their feathers and grooming them with natural oils, our feathered friends are able to help insulate their bodies from cold.

 You can keep water thawed with a submersible heater placed directly in the water...it's economical and safe, as long as you use a high-quality, outdoor extension cord to plug the heater into an electrical source. In winter, use a rough-surfaced, plastic saucer for a birdbath...ceramic and concrete ones, though fine for summer use, will crack easily in frigid weather.

 

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